Coming up next week at the Byrd CLS: A discussion with Brady King
If you are interested in a future career on Capitol Hill, you will definitely want to stop by the CLS next Tuesday, October 28, at 1:00 pm to participate in a discussion with Brady King, former National Security Adviser to Senator Ted Kennedy and Chief of Staff for Senator Roland Burris. 
Free Event!

Coming up next week at the Byrd CLS: A discussion with Brady King

If you are interested in a future career on Capitol Hill, you will definitely want to stop by the CLS next Tuesday, October 28, at 1:00 pm to participate in a discussion with Brady King, former National Security Adviser to Senator Ted Kennedy and Chief of Staff for Senator Roland Burris. 

Free Event!

This Week in History: On October 14, 1980, President Jimmy Carter signed the Staggers Rail Act into law, removing outdated regulations that had prevented railroads from competing with trucking and air shipping providers. The Staggers Rail Act has been largely credited with saving the railroad industry in the United States and is one of the greatest legacies of Congressman Staggers’ 32-year career in Congress.

This Week in History: On October 14, 1980, President Jimmy Carter signed the Staggers Rail Act into law, removing outdated regulations that had prevented railroads from competing with trucking and air shipping providers. The Staggers Rail Act has been largely credited with saving the railroad industry in the United States and is one of the greatest legacies of Congressman Staggers’ 32-year career in Congress.

38th President Dwight D. Eisenhower was born on October 14, 1890. 

President Eisenhower entered office in 1953, the same year that Robert C. Byrd began his first term in the U.S House of Representatives. Eisenhower was present to welcome the freshmen class of Congressmen and presented Byrd with a signed photograph.

The relationship between Congressman Byrd and President Eisenhower focused mainly on Byrd’s efforts to bring more economic opportunities to West Virginia. This proved to be a struggle, however, as Eisenhower placed more emphasis on foreign trade and was apparently unaware of the poor economic conditions plaguing West Virginia. According to Byrd biographer David Corbin, Eisenhower “was under the impression that West Virginia coal mines were running ‘full blast.’

Byrd pushed for several pieces of legislation to boost West Virginia’s economy during the Eisenhower administration, including the Area Redevelopment Act and H.R Bill 1775, which called for the establishment of quota limitations on imports of foreign oil. Byrd also made an effort to work with the federal government to increase coal exports from the United States. All of these attempts were met with resistance from the Eisenhower administration.

Byrd struggled with passing depressed area legislation for the remainder of Eisenhower’s time as President. It was this difficult experience with the President that inspired Byrd to make his run for Senate in order to work more closely with future administrations. 

By Malorie Matos 

David Corbin, The Last Great Senator: Robert C. Byrd’s Encounters with Eleven U.S. Presidents (Dulles: Potomac Books Inc., 2012), 33.

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todaysdocument:


Act for 1789 Federal Government Appropriations, 9/29/1789.
General Records of the United States Government

Article I, Section 8, of the U.S. Constitution gave Congress the power to raise revenue to “pay the Debts and provide for the common Defense and general Welfare of the United States.” The first appropriations act passed by the new Congress was signed into law on September 29, 1789, and set a budget of $639,000 to cover the Federal Government’s expenses for that year.
via DocsTeach

todaysdocument:

Act for 1789 Federal Government Appropriations, 9/29/1789.

General Records of the United States Government

Article I, Section 8, of the U.S. Constitution gave Congress the power to raise revenue to “pay the Debts and provide for the common Defense and general Welfare of the United States.” The first appropriations act passed by the new Congress was signed into law on September 29, 1789, and set a budget of $639,000 to cover the Federal Government’s expenses for that year.

via DocsTeach